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Kusama Infinity Mirrors 2 If you have tickets to Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors, congratulations! You made it through the crazy-long walk-up line or the Monday noon online click-off. If you don’t have tickets (or if you don’t even know what I am talking about), check out Part 1: Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors DC with Kids: Part 1 – Getting Tickets. Here I am with our tickets for two adults and eight kids ranging from 1.5 to 9, the product of waiting in line for nearly two hours.

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Before I go any further, let me remind you of my top two pieces of advice:

  1. Come with boundless patience. If you don’t like lines or if you have a specific schedule, this is not the exhibit for you. One friend referred to the exhibit as Infinity Lines. You have to know that before anything else. You will be waiting in a lot of lines for a mere 20-30 seconds in the various Infinity Rooms. Out of my roughly 1.5 hours in the exhibit, I spent 30 minutes looking at the artwork and an hour waiting in lines.
  2. Go with a buddy. I went with another mom and her kids. This allowed us to tag-team waiting in line and keeping kids entertained.

Are you still in? Great!

Building Entry
To get into the Hirshhorn with your Kusama tickets, use the special entrance near the giant pumpkin which is on the side of museum facing the Capitol.
Before you go in, consider using the outdoor bathrooms. There are bathrooms inside, but they are downstairs in the museum. Either way, stop and use the restroom before you enter the exhibit which does not allow reentry. (Note: the outdoor bathrooms are only open in the morning. When all tickets for the day are given out and the line disperses, these bathrooms close.) Read more…

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If you’ve been on Facebook recently and have friends who live near Washington, D.C., you may have noticed beautiful, sparkling, many-mirrored pictures from Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrors exhibit at the Hirshhorn Museum. It is a mind-bending exhibit that is wildly popular. So, how do you get in to see this? Is it worth it? What is it like with kids? 

Kusama Infinity Mirrors Part 1

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The mealtime battles have been intense around my house recently. So many meals begin with grumbles instead of gratitude. A dish loved one day is hated the next, then third day it becomes OK again. Plates get over-loaded with food and then it gets trashed. One child seemed to be subsisting on air (ok, fruit) with a negative impact on behavior. Of course, a kid is going to be crazy with fructose hyping the system but no protein to make those nutrients stick. Mealtime questioning, crying, and negotiation was taking over. (I think that last one is the worst for kid and parent alike. It dominates the meal for the adult, gives the child all sorts of attention for a behavior we don’t want to see more of; and it makes food a power struggle rather than about nourishment, enjoyment, and respecting feelings of satiety–not over-full.) One week I decided just to make whatever I wanted even if everyone else hated it because they were going to gripe about it any way. No surprise, but that didn’t actually fix anything.

End Kid Food Battles

 

Hubby and I found ourselves repeating certain mealtime platitudes endlessly, only to realize we were applying them in different ways. “Eat the food you have before getting new food” works differently when a kid serves himself versus when a parent scoops up adult-sized portions. And, how many meals should leftovers be re-offered for anyway? As a family that rarely has dessert, do we expect clean plates first or do we just eat the beet brownies whenever, however on those few occasions? With all of these questions, and so much frustration, the family decided that we should sit down and come up with some rules together.  Coming up with a morning routine recently has been helpful (despite a rough start), so we figured we’d formalize our mealtime guidelines, too. Here they are!

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This morning was our first go at a morning routine chart for the kids and it went terribly, as in 9-1-1 fire department bad.

Fire Truck on Our Street

The 6yo has been asking for ways to earn money recently, “Like a real job, mom.” I agreed that this was a good age, but I needed time to figure out what things are normal family responsibilities versus extra payable work. I polled friends about chores and allowance, I read articles, I hemmed and hawed. Then my mom died unexpectedly and it all got put on hold as we packed up for South Dakota for a week to do loads and loads of work, logistics, and mourning. It was a miserable time, but the thing about kids is that they stay so grounded, which helps our world keep on turning. They helped without complaint while we were there (or I tuned out the complaints, one or the other). But, as soon as we walked back into our house after the trip, Mr.6 asked me how he could earn some cash. I came up with a list of basic cleaning jobs he could do after the standard 10 minutes of post-dinner responsibilities, and he sprang into action. The kid scrubbed the toilet and mopped the floor, hooray!

But, what about the basic responsibilities for the rest of the day? I still needed to solve that part of the equation. Enter the Morning Personal Responsibilities visual chart. I typed it up and Mr. 6 helped me select clip art. It’s pretty cute, if I do say so myself.  Read more…

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It’s pumpkin processing day! It is a day that I love and loathe. I love it because it means FALL IS HERE and the yield is great! I loathe it because it takes a long time to cut the pumpkins, roast them, cool them, peel them, process, can up the puree, roast the seeds, and then clean up. OK, OK, if you’ve been over to my house, you know we pretty much never get the dishes done the same day. But, sometime in the next week (or two), Dave or I will have to do those dishes. Over the years, I have gotten better at the whole process (almost 8 years to the day, I wrote this post about my first attempt), but now the complicating factor is three adorable little helpers/distractors. 

Today, though, the stars aligned and the children played outside amazingly while I worked inside on this. I like to cook with the kids, but Baby T (16 months) is a wildcard with cooking right now. He loves to shove his brothers off of step stools, climb the Learning Tower and put his fingers where the knife is cutting or throw ingredients on the ground, etc. My go-to of wearing baby on my back doesn’t always work well with this one. He likes to be IN THE ACTION and will start clawing at my back and pulling my hair to get down. Needless to say, any sort of cooking is just hard right now. Yet, enter today! The lovely fall weather just made everything work out. I was able to keep the back door open to the screen porch and let Baby T play in the dirt pile along with V (5.5) and E (4) while they played away. In the morning I asked if they would like to go to the library, and for the first time ever I got a no. “We want to play a complicated construction game today, and we will need all morning–like hours,” V told me. Sure enough, they got intently into digging and arranging dirt, bricks, and streams of water into some sort of kiln-like structure. They shared tools and trucks peaceably for hours. It was amazing and rare! I still am shocked about it, and so, so grateful. It was needed after a ton of sibling conflict recently.

With them happy in the backyard, I excused myself to the kitchen. The weather was perfect for leaving the back door open to the screen porch so I could still hear all of T’s pips and babble and watch the three of them team together. Usually T has to stay in the porch or house  when I am in the kitchen (and then screams at me) because he gets into everything in the yard: climbs up the swing set ladder, picks mushrooms, etc. But, today he was happy to stay at the dirt pile and perfectly within sight and sound of me. Flitting in and out of the house to help him as needed, get everyone de-mudded and fed, etc. throughout the day actually worked well because it gave me breaks in the midst of the long process.  I actually think it was the most pleasant pumpkin processing day I’ve had! 

For the past few years, I have used “neck pumpkins” (Pennsylvania Dutch Crookneck Squash) rather than pie pumpkins (or even jack-o-lantern ones). They have such a sweet flavor and are comparatively easier to cut into than the super-thick-skinned orange variety. Plus, the slender, long neck is all flesh with no seeds so it yields a lot of puree. These two came from Great Country Farms

Neck Pumpkins Read more…

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In 2015, Mothering.com published a piece I wrote on Mommy Wars (also on the MG4LG blog). In summer 2016, I got to turn that article into a 45-minute talk for Mommy Con DC called Declaring War on Mommy Wars: Graceful Communication in the Midst of Conflict. Mommy Con is a nation-wide natural parenting conference that attracts over 1,000 visitors to its DC stop. Not only was it awesome to speak, but I got to hear information  on other interesting topics and visit all sorts of vendors, including Jessica Haney of Mindful Healthy Life who interviewed me early this summer.

Photo Credit: Mindful Healthy Life

Photo Credit: Mindful Healthy Life

Here’s the premise of the talk: Read more…

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DIY: Homeschool Car Magnet

Our family started considering ourselves homeschoolers last year, but this is the year that my oldest, V, is Kindergarten-eligible so we are “official” in the sense that we have declared our homeschooling status to the county. Last year, the kids wanted a school name and we settled on Fontanafax Adventure School. This year, their request was to have a school magnet to put on the back of our car. So, we made one! Magnets made to cover air vents are large and heavy-duty, so we used that as our base. Through a couple of discussions, we came up with this design:

Homeschool Car Magnet

The overall arrow shape represents Read more…

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Snow Day Fun: Mining for Gems

DC Blizzard 2016/Snowzilla actually happened! We got over 24 inches at our house. With the drifting, our cars became mere lumps in the driveway. Dave and V spent hours digging us out (not that a snowplow has come by yet).

Baby T’s first time in the snow was one for the record books in terms of snowfall. It was also memorable for us. T is the smiliest baby I have ever known, and it was a hoot too see him take that personality outside. At first, he just sat with curiosity as brothers dumped snow on him brought him snow, then he started reaching out to touch and taste and the smiles started. After awhile, he tipped  himself over on to his belly and scooted across as much of the sidewalk as he could with glee, just as he does inside the house. 

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As for indoor fun while snowbound, we decided to “mine” for “gems” by Read more…

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V Turns 5

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Five years ago we were blessed with our precious son V after a hard road to parenthood. He experiences the world deeply and notices things that others might miss. Read more…

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The Christmas Story in Pictures


Luke 2:1-:20

In those days, Caesar Augustus made a law. It required that a list be made of everyone in the whole Roman world. It was the first time a list was made of the people while Quirinius was governor of Syria.  Everyone went to their own town to be listed. So Joseph went also. He went from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea. That is where Bethlehem, the town of David, was. Joseph went there because he belonged to the family line of David. He went there with Mary to be listed. Mary was engaged to him. She was expecting a baby.

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While Joseph and Mary were there, the time came for the child to be born. She gave birth to her first baby. It was a boy. She wrapped him in large strips of cloth. Then she placed him in a manger. That’s because there was no guest room where they could stay.

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